Family And Medical Insurance Leave Act

The United States was one of only four countries surveyed that did not ensure access to some sort of paid maternity leave. The FAMILY Act will change that. 

The United States is one of only four countries surveyed that did not ensure access to some sort of paid maternity leave. The Family And Medical Insurance Leave Act (FAMILY Act) would allow the United States to join the majority of the rest of the world by establishing a national family and medical leave insurance program.

Introduced by Senator Kristen Gillibrand in the Senate and Congresswoman Rose DeLauro in the House, the Family Act ensures that employees would earn a portion of their wages (66% up to a capped amount) for up to 60 workdays, or 12 workweeks in a year. During this time, employees may address their own serious health issues, including pregnancy or childbirth; to deal with the serious health issues of a parent, spouse, domestic partner or child; to care for a new child; and/or for specific military caregiving and leave purposes.

The insurance would be paid for by small employee and employers payroll contributions of two cents per $10 in wages (about $1.50 per week for a typical worker). The payroll contributions would go to a self-sustaining fund, which would be administered through a new Office of Paid Family and Medical Leave. Fund contributions would cover both benefits and administrative costs.

SCRA has joined over 450 organizations, including APA and SPSSI, in expressing its support for this legislation. We would like to ask that you do the same as individuals.

While the bill has not yet made it out of committee, it is gaining increased interest and currently has 21 co-sponsors. 

You can contact your legislators through the link below.